Mat Budymat Davallet

Mat Budymat Davallet

Saturday, 27 October 2018 08:50

MATCHBOX-match-bro for sale

- 235€ (Shipping not included) - Available - rare -


 

Saturday, 27 October 2018 08:48

MATCHBOX-6A-supersustain for sale

- 145€ (Shipping not included) - Available - 


 

Saturday, 27 October 2018 00:44

Sho-bud History - Serials numbers - Docs


Serials numbers for Sho-Bud pedal steel guitars

6138 Single Neck 10 strings 3 pedals
6139 Single Neck 10 strings 3 pedals, 1 knee lever
6140 Single Neck 10 strings 6 pedals, no knee lever
6141 Double Neck 6 pedals, 1 knee lever-maple body
6142 Double Neck 6 pedals, 1 knee lever-rosewood body
6143 Professional Model Double Neck 10 strings 8 pedals, 2 knee levers
6148 Pro-I Single Neck 10 strings 3 pedals, 2 knee levers
6150 LDG Single Neck 10 strings 3 pedals, 4 knee levers
6152 Maverick Single Neck 10 strings 3 pedals, 1 knee lever
6155 Pro-II Double Neck 10 strings 8 pedals, 2 knee levers
6160 Pro-I Single Neck 12 string 3 pedals, 4 knee levers
6164 Pro-III Double Neck 10 strings 8 pedals, 4 knee levers
6165 Pro-II Double Neck 12 strings 8 pedals, 4 knee levers
6166 Super Pro Double Neck 10 strings 8 pedals, 6 knee levers


Sho-Bud documentations & manuals

pdf icon Sho-Bud Professional - Owner's Manual

pdf iconSho~Bud Pro I, II, III, and Super Pro - Owner's Manual


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Saturday, 27 October 2018 00:42

Sho-bud History - Super pro II

SUPER PRO II

After the Jackson family sold the Sho-Bud company to Gretsch in 1979, Gretsch came out with a modified version of the Super Pro. Not exactly considered a production run, several Super-Pro-II's were built by the Gretsch company around 1984. The Gretsch price list from 1983 lists the Super Pro-II as a double 10 string, 8 pedals, 6 knee levers with a suggested price of $3530

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Saturday, 27 October 2018 00:40

Sho-bud History - Keyless

SHO-BUD KEYLESS

Although this model was never really produced by Sho-Bud, it is mentioned here because several prototype Keyless pedal steels (Single-10) were made. The Keyless was built to eliminate the raise and lower changer mechanism by using permanent changer fingers at both ends of the guitar. One end to raise and the other end to lower. The Keyless guitar idea never caught on with Sho-Bud and the idea was dropped. Had Sho-Bud continued with the development of the Keyless, they would have no doubt, been successful. Today, many pedal steel manufactures offer keyless models that play and sound great.



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Saturday, 27 October 2018 00:35

Sho-bud History - Super pro

SUPER PRO

In 1977, the Super Pro was introduced. It was standard as a double wood or metal neck, with 8 pedals and 6 knee levers. This model and the Fender/ShoBud was very similar in design except for the body and the key head. The Super Pro had a streamlined-smaller and thinner body design then the Sho-Bud models of the past. Also, the undercarriage pretty much the same as the Fender/Sho-Bud model, was very different then the past Sho-Bud models. The cross rods on the past models were round. On the Super Pro they were hex shaped. The bell cranks and pedal rods were also of a new design. Small metal tuning rod clips were used to hold the tuning rods onto the bell crank. The floor pedals on the Super Pro were small narrow pedals that had a very different look then the past wide pedal design. The knee lever design changed as well, to a straight narrow lever. The tuning key head was square and blunt on the end instead of the old standard tear drop key head of the past. Clearly, Sho-Bud had a new pedal steel. This new undercarriage design was very popular. After the introduction of the Super Pro, the undercarriage designs of the Pro-Series and the LDG pedal steels changed to the Super Pro style. When the Super Pro was first introduced in 1977, the retail price was $2175. Gretsch in 1981 listed the Super Pro at $2850.



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Saturday, 27 October 2018 00:34

Sho-bud History - Sho-Bud - Fender

FENDER / SHO-BUD

In the early 1970's the Fender Guitar Company contracted Sho-Bud to produce a Fender/Sho-Bud pedal steel. This model and the Super Pro were very similar in design except for the body and the key head. The undercarriage was basically the same as used on the future Super Pro. These Fender/Sho-Bud pedal steels had the ash tray Fender style keyhead. The changer used was a triple raise-double lower, and was similar to the Super Pro changer. Other then the changer and undercarriage, this model had a look that was different then the regular Sho-Buds.



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Saturday, 27 October 2018 00:32

Sho-bud History - Lloyd Green model

Loyd Green model (LDG)

Production started around 1973. The idea came from Lloyd Green in the fact that he was not playing the C6 neck too much and wanted the back neck and C6 pedals removed to decrease weight. A soft foam pad was put on the back neck as an arm rest. The first LDG's were basically early Pro-II with the pad installed. Later, the body, undercarriage, changer, and mechanics evolved over time with the Pro-Series and then the Super Pro. The early 1970's suggested price list for an LDG was $1195. The 1976 catalog lists the price at $1195 retail, and Gretsch in 1981 list price was $1720.


Ldg models gallery


One of my last Llloyd green refurbishment (mid 70's model)


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Saturday, 27 October 2018 00:30

Sho-bud History - Maverick

MAVERICK

Want a pedal steel guitar for just $400? Sho-Buds answer was the Maverick. Designed with 3 foot pedals and one knee lever, the player of this single 10 string model could get most of the Nashville pedal steel sounds. Production started in the very early 1970's and this model was designed with the beginner in mind. The changer and undercarriage was based on the old permanent system and could not be changed. The three foot pedals were standard E9 changes and the one knee lever standard lowered the second string and eighth string one half tone. The first production Mavericks had a solid birdseye maple body with clear lacquer finish, and a raised wood neck with the regular tear drop keyhead. Almost all of these early Mavericks were the clear (blonde) natural finish. Later though, Sho-Bud came up with a way to cut the cost of building the Maverick by covering the unfinished body with a brown wood grained covering. The tear drop keyhead was also changed to an ash tray style keyhead. The Mavericks were popular and many were produced through the years. These models were built pretty much continually from the early 70's on. In the early 1970's, Sho-Buds suggested price for the solid birdseye maple style was $425. A later catalog lists the price for $395. The 1976 catalog suggested price list for the wood grained covered Maverick was $360 retail. Its interesting to note that the Gretsch Company's suggested price list for the same wood grained covered Maverick was $790 in 1981.



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Saturday, 27 October 2018 00:26

Sho-bud History - The pro series

THE PRO SERIES

Sho-Bud introduced the Pro Series approximately late 1972 with the Pro-II. Although the Pro-I had been around for some time, considered by many to be just a single neck Professional, it was soon called the Pro-I. The Pro-I was standard first with three pedals and one knee lever. The Pro-I and II were a very popular pedal steel for Sho-Bud, however, the Professional model continued to be produced well into 1974. The undercarriage of the Pro II featured rods and bellcranks that replaced the baskets on the Professional model. The early Pro Series as well as the early LDG models used a single raise-single lower changer with any additional raise or lower of the same string provided by a brass tuning collar on the rod. Later the Pro-II employed a double raise-single lower changer. In 1975, Sho-Bud introduced the Pro-III featuring metal necks. The standard changer on the Pro-III was a double raise-double lower. Also, in 1975, the Pro Series body designed changed from a rounded body front to a square front. The floor pedals also changed to a narrow design. This was the start of the Pro/Custom series. Also during this time a new nylon rod tuning changer was introduced on the Pros. This enabled the player to tune all of the pedal/knee raises and lowers at the right end plate which was a great improvement over the changer and undercarriage of the past. As was stated, the Pro-I had been around a number of years before the Pro-II and Pro-III. In the early 1970's, Sho-Buds suggested price list for the Pro-I was $995. In 1976 the Pro-I Custom listed $895 retail. Gretsch in 1981 listed the Pro-I for $1450. The Pro-II in the early 70's listed at $1595. In the 1976 catalog the Pro-II was $1595 retail and the 1981 Gretsch catalog suggsted price was $2120. The Pro-III first produced in 1975, had a retail price of $1795 for the Pro-III Custom in 1976, and Gretsch listed it for $2350 in 1981.



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